Saving Lives & Saving Frames How Speedrunning Rules Twitch With GDQ
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Adam Neylan Writer
Tomas Roldan Video Editor
Adam Fitzsimmons Lead Graphic Designer
Colin McNeil Supervising Producer

Watching a speedrun can be…boring.

It’s an activity where “runners” speed through single player games as quickly as possible. To do this, they utilize tricks, glitches and RNG manipulation to reach the end in record time. Viewers could watch the same 20 seconds of a game over and over…and over…all because the speedrunner was just a pixel off of perfection.

But, twice a year the Games Done Quick charity streams make speedrunning exciting. For a week straight, GDQ takes over twitch in a dazzling display of pixels; capturing the attention of thousands and raising millions for charity.

What is Games Done Quick?

Speedrunning rules Twitch with GDQ because it effectively functions as the Super Bowl of speedrunning; showcasing the best that the community has to offer and the product of all those long hours of practice. Since GDQ’s speedrunning tradition began in a basement years ago, the organization has grown into a powerhouse. It pulls hundreds of thousands of concurrent viewers and over 30 million dollars for charity — overcoming controversy, COVID-19 and a bit of cringe in the process. 

Games Done Quick is a charity marathon stream that offers speedrunners an opportunity to showcase their prowess — with support from commentators to explain tricks, run strategies and to add a little hype during difficult moments.

Watch more and subscribe to Upcomer’s YouTube channel here.

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