What we learned from VCT Stage 3 NA open qualifiers
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The open qualifiers for VALORANT Champions Tour (VCT) Stage 3 Challengers North America have concluded, and with it comes a new perspective on the teams competing. Over the weekend we saw several teams rise to the occasion, while others crumbled when it mattered most. Regardless of the outcome, we left the tournament with lessons learned.

Sentinels and Version1 qualified for a reason

The two representatives at the first VALORANT international tournament – Sentinels and Version1 – proved once again why they were sent overseas. Both teams started the event in round 32, giving them a sizable lead over their opponents. Despite the leg up, Version1 and Sentinels danced their way through the competition. Version1 even did it without Jordan “Zellsis” Montemurro, who is currently on suspension. We will be seeing both teams at the main event on their journey toward Masters 3 in Berlin.

Roster changes didn’t do much

Only a handful of teams came out of the VALORANT off-season without new faces on their roster. From the countless number of off-season roster moves, only three teams that made changes qualified for the main event. XSET, Envy, and Gen.G were counted as those whose changes had fruitful outcomes. However, for teams like TSM, T1, FaZe Clan, Luminosity, and Immortals, who all made changes themselves, they failed to hit the mark with their new rosters.

Competition is getting more fierce

Across the weekend, the VALORANT Champions Tour saw multiple upsets off-stream. There was so much going on behind the scenes that Nerd Street Gamers had to add additional streams to capture all the action. FaZe Clan fell early in the bracket to DarkZero esports, Immortals lost to Kansas City Pioneers, NRG lost to VIRTUOSO and TSM lost to Noble. Several teams also took maps off of some of the top teams, which proves that the amateur teams are catching up.

VALORANT Champions Tour Stage 3 now moves from the VCT qualifiers, to the Challengers Main event, beginning July 8. Those games will continue through July 11 to determine which four teams make it to the Challengers Playoffs. The event will also determine who walks away with the $20,000 first-place prize.

Danny Appleford is an esports journalist for Upcomer that started writing for Daily Esports in 2020. He now specializes in articles surrounding League of Legends, Call of Duty, VALORANT and Halo.
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